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Posts tagged women

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Women in the United States are more likely to die during or shortly after childbirth than women in nearly all countries in Europe and many in Asia and the Middle East, according to the United Nations.


While maternal mortality declined in most countries over the past 20 years, it has not just increased, but nearly doubled, in the United States.


Experts blame the high death rate partly on the heavy reliance the United States places on technological intervention, particularly when it results, as it so often does, in surgical delivery via cesarean section.

Nicole Montesano on C Sections and motherhood mortality rates

Filed under Motherhood Mondays C Section Cesarean Section women

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The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities has compiled data on the effect of tax credits for working families on women- specifically, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC). Arloc Sherman has more:

Using data and procedures explained here, I estimate that the EITC kept an estimated 3.4 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010.  That figure includes the effect of temporary 2009 Recovery Act expansions in the EITC, which alone kept 233,000 women and girls above the poverty line.
The numbers rise when you include a second federal income tax credit — the less well-known CTC, which provides up to $1,000 per child for working families:  together, the CTC and EITC kept 4.9 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010, including more than 800,000 just by the Recovery Act’s expansions of both credits.

The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities has compiled data on the effect of tax credits for working families on women- specifically, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC). Arloc Sherman has more:

Using data and procedures explained here, I estimate that the EITC kept an estimated 3.4 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010.  That figure includes the effect of temporary 2009 Recovery Act expansions in the EITC, which alone kept 233,000 women and girls above the poverty line.

The numbers rise when you include a second federal income tax credit — the less well-known CTC, which provides up to $1,000 per child for working families:  together, the CTC and EITC kept 4.9 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010, including more than 800,000 just by the Recovery Act’s expansions of both credits.

Filed under poverty women tax taxes taxation budget recovery