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Posts tagged sexism

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Federal Contraception Rule Has Several Precedents

The ACLU describes why it’s not a violation of your freedom of religion to enforce laws that limit discrimination- and demonstrates that it’s well established with legal precedent.

While today’s controversy centers around access to contraception and eradicating gender discrimination, the claim that the business makes in today’s case – that religious objections should trump laws designed to promote equality – is not unique. A few examples:

•    In 1966, three African-American customers brought a suit against Piggie Park restaurants, and their owner, Maurice Bessinger, for refusal to serve them. Bessinger argued that enforcement of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits that type of discrimination, violated his religious freedom “since his religious beliefs compel[ed] him to oppose any integration of the races whatever.”

•    In 1976, Roanoke Valley Christian Schools added a “head of household” supplement to their teachers’ salaries – which according to their beliefs meant married men, and not women. When sued under the Equal Pay Act, Roanoke Valley claimed a right to an exemption. According to the church pastor affiliated with the school, “[w]hen we turned to the Scriptures to determine head of household, by scriptural basis, we found that the Bible clearly teaches that the husband is the head of the house, head of the wife, head of the family.” 

•    In the 1980’s, Bob Jones University, a religiously-affiliated school in South Carolina, wanted an exemption from a rule denying tax-exempt status to schools that practice racial discrimination. The “sponsors of the University genuinely believe[d] that the Bible forbids interracial dating and marriage,” and it was school policy that students engaged in interracial relationships, or advocacy thereof, would be expelled. 

Fortunately, in all of these cases, the court rejected the claim that religious beliefs can trump anti-discrimination laws. Even in the 1960’s, the court recognized that although a business owner has a constitutional right to express his religious beliefs, he does not have an absolute right to exercise such beliefs “in utter disregard” of the rights of others. The court in today’s case should follow history and what courts have long recognized: that religion is not a license to discriminate.

Filed under Religion discrimination Sexism ACLU

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denver area people

outtogetthehoney:

the 27th of this month at Mercury Cafe at 7pm the Denver ISO will be doing a talk/discussion entitted “You’re Not Crazy, It’s Sexism.”

My friend Marie is going to be leading the talk and I’m going to be moderating! We are not speakers and are both nervous, but very passionate, and would love for more people to be there!

If you are my tumblr friend, come on! This will be a good chance to meet =]

I’ll definitely be there!

Filed under Denver Colorado ISO Feminism Sexism

668 notes

For many years, sex work was a solution. I could work and go to school. I could travel, live and work all over the world, participating in unpaid internships taken for granted as part of the undergraduate experience. As an undergraduate, I worked at two domestic violence shelters and as a rape crisis counselor. I went on to work in nonprofit development, grant-writing for a Somali women’s health organization in London, UK and, later, for a nonprofit that ran after-school programs for disadvantaged girls here in New York City, where I eventually made my home. In graduate school, I worked as a consultant for a high-profile feminist organization while also working as a research assistant in the Pediatrics Department of a public hospital. During this same time, I sold sex.

Sex work defines the people who do it like no other occupation. Associated with deviance, drug use, mental illness and disease, to be labelled a “prostitute” is to be cast as the lowest of the low. No matter the realities of our experiences, we are thought of as victims and as inherently damaged, either before or as a result of our profession. Sex workers are considered a danger to society, unfit for serious public service. Worst of all: once a sex worker, always a whore.

Eventually, for me, it proved to be too much. Despite all it had afforded me, sex work was a far from perfect occupation. The stigma associated with the profession only exacerbated the rigors of the work.

I Lost My Job as a Teacher Because I Was Once a Call Girl
Melissa Petro 

As I get older I’m realizing, more and more frequently, that George Carlin was wrong about a lot of things. A lot of things. But he was absolutely right about sex work. Selling is legal. Sex is legal. Why is selling sex not legal?

It doesn’t make you less of a person. It doesn’t change anything about you, other than your current employment situation. It’s filling the gap in a long-existing market, which is supposed to be exactly the sort of thing that capitalists and free-market advocates are all about. How do we live in a country that supports child labor before it shows support for a woman’s right to do what they damn well please with their own bodies?

Melissa Petro has two masters degrees, one of which is in Childhood Education, but she isn’t qualified to teach school children because she used to have sex more than some people? Or is it because she found a way to pay for her education that didn’t involve six-figure debt, thanks to a job without long hours. and didn’t interfere with the number of other projects she filled her life with?

Regardless, I call bullshit.

(via manicchill)

(via manicchill)

Filed under truth sexism patriarchy

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[I]n order for Mom to be able to go on welfare if she has a child out of wedlock, you have to tell us who the father is… If you don’t tell us who the father is, you’re not eligible for any welfare benefits, none, not even medical care. You tell us who the father is or you don’t receive benefits…We say to Mom that you tell us the wrong name, and we’ll bring that guy in and we’ll do a blood test and that’s not Dad, you lose your welfare benefits.
Rick Santorum, 1994, advocating paternity tests for every single mother on welfare.

Filed under sexism rick santorum welfare

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No woman deserves to be disrespected in this manner. This language is an attack on all women, and has been used throughout history to silence our voices.

The millions of American women who have and will continue to speak out in support of women’s health care and access to contraception prove that we will not be silenced.
Sandra Fluke, in response to Rush Limbaugh’s numerous slurs

Filed under sandra fluke sexism

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The first Year of the Woman was 1992, when a number of women were elected to the Senate. A lot of elections since then have been dubbed that as well, and the 2010 midterms were supposed to be another female sweep, yet their numbers actually declined slightly in that election.
But taking a step back for a bit, this chart makes it seem a little silly to say that any year has truly been a Year of the Woman for the United States Congress…
The chart comes from a new report by the Congressional Research Service on the demographics of Congress. Note the highest value in the vertical axis of the first chart is just 18 percent. We haven’t broken that mark in either the Senate or the House yet, even though women are over half the American population. It’s been almost 100 years since the first woman was elected to Congress (not to mention that we’ve had the vote since 1920), yet we haven’t even taken a quarter of the seats yet.
I’ve discussed the many reasons women don’t run for office before. A lot of them are hardwired through socialization into women’s heads at a young age. This is a systemic problem that doesn’t have many quick fixes. But it’s clear that we’re doing a pitiful job of making our political representation look like an actual representation of our people.

It’s inconceivable to me that people deny the clear oppression against women. Only around 16% of Congress is female, and the current numbers are almost record breaking (the record in the House is 95 women, compared to the current 92, and the Senate has the most women as members as it’s ever had except the 111th and 110th).
We should stop taxing women until they get proper representation. 

The first Year of the Woman was 1992, when a number of women were elected to the Senate. A lot of elections since then have been dubbed that as well, and the 2010 midterms were supposed to be another female sweep, yet their numbers actually declined slightly in that election.

But taking a step back for a bit, this chart makes it seem a little silly to say that any year has truly been a Year of the Woman for the United States Congress…

The chart comes from a new report by the Congressional Research Service on the demographics of Congress. Note the highest value in the vertical axis of the first chart is just 18 percent. We haven’t broken that mark in either the Senate or the House yet, even though women are over half the American population. It’s been almost 100 years since the first woman was elected to Congress (not to mention that we’ve had the vote since 1920), yet we haven’t even taken a quarter of the seats yet.

I’ve discussed the many reasons women don’t run for office before. A lot of them are hardwired through socialization into women’s heads at a young age. This is a systemic problem that doesn’t have many quick fixes. But it’s clear that we’re doing a pitiful job of making our political representation look like an actual representation of our people.

It’s inconceivable to me that people deny the clear oppression against women. Only around 16% of Congress is female, and the current numbers are almost record breaking (the record in the House is 95 women, compared to the current 92, and the Senate has the most women as members as it’s ever had except the 111th and 110th).

We should stop taxing women until they get proper representation. 

Filed under sexism government congress feminism year of the woman

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Just a few weeks ago, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta commented on a new Pentagon report on sexual abuse in the military. I think they have actually discovered there is a difference between men and women. And the sexual abuse report says that there has been, since 2006, a 64% increase in violent sexual assaults. Now, what did they expect? These people are in close contact, the whole airing of this issue has never been done by Congress, it’s strictly been a question of pressure from the feminist.

And the feminists have also directed them, really, to spend a lot of money. They have sexual counselors all over the place, victims’ advocates, sexual response coordinators. … So, you have this whole bureaucracy upon bureaucracy being built up with all kinds of levels of people to support women in the military who are now being raped too much.

Liz Trotta, explaining how women in the military should have ‘expected’ to be raped and that it’s really the feminists to blame.

(Source: thinkprogress.org)

Filed under Fox Pundit rape culture misogyny sexism

800 notes

Women don’t get raises — even when they ask. Forever research has told women they don’t get raises because they’re not assertive enough, not because men are sexist or anything silly like that. Turns out it does have something to do with discrimination. Even pushy women don’t get raises. Looking at thousands of MBA grads, research from Catalyst, a a non-profit research organization that focuses on businesses, found no significant difference in the proportion of men and women who asked for raises or promotions. Yet, the women received slower compensation growth than the women who said nothing at all, whereas for the men it paid off.

pushy women don’t get raises either: the atlantic

a longer article at the washington post

the original study (free access)

(via dogplanet)

Filed under sexism patriarchy

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Why do people find sexism funny

And by ‘people’ what I mean is ‘male Americans ages 14-24’. I just honestly don’t get the unending entertainment from it. Is it some sort of cognitive dissonance release, like by actually vocalizing the sexism that’s present daily they get some sort of psychological satisfaction? Jokes about women being bad drivers just aren’t funny. Jokes about women in the kitchen are so overplayed that even if it were funny, by now it would be run dead into the ground. I gotta stop reading comments in the morning, sets my mood directly to pissy.

Filed under reddit sexism humor