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manicchill:

Colorado’s Secretary of State Joins Republicans in the War on Voters
Since first entering the race, to be Colorado’s next Secretary of State, controversy has been Scott Gessler’s constant companion. Whether it be his hypocritical public stance on “soft” campaign contributions, the ethics violations of his top donors, blocking Pueblo Country from sending ballots to soldiers, or his efforts to prevent cities/counties from mailing ballots to absentee voters, Mr. Gessler hasn’t made many friends outside of his own party/inner circle.
Now, he’s drawing national attention for his recent decision to re-interpret, and in some cases completely throw out, Colorado’s long-standing campaign finance disclosure laws.
from The Colorado Independent:

Government watchdog group Colorado Ethics Watch has been engaged in a legal back and forth with Secretary of State Scott Gessler over a campaign finance rule adopted by the Secretary of State last spring. In a brief filed with a Denver District court Wednesday, Ethics Watch argues Gessler is rewriting the law instead of merely setting forth rules directing citizens on how to abide it, and, in a counter claim, Gessler is asking the court to effectively throw out a constitutional provision he has sworn he would defend as an elected official.
Gessler has asked the court to declare the legal definition of an “issue committee” unenforceable, meaning he effectively would do away with issue committees and the financial and reporting laws that apply to them until if and when the legislature would remake them.
“It’s breathtaking,” Ethics Watch Director Luis Toro told the Colorado Independent. “As a representative of the state, [Gessler] would normally be the defendant in such a case… But he’s effectively asking two private organizations to defend the Colorado Constitution from his complaint. How can he sue two organizations that don’t represent the state?”
Read More

To any familiar with his past, as a campaign finance attorney with a long history of battling disclosure rules, Scott Gessler’s actions were predictable. They also join a long, and continually growing, list of Republican moves aimed at crippling the Democratic Party and base nationwide. Gessler has justified his actions by saying they are no different than the Justice Department’s recent decision to stop defending the Defense of Marriage Act in court.
Watchdog and ethics groups have countered that Secretary of State Gessler’s stance stands in stark opposition to the state’s history of being defended by its public officials. Many point to then-Governor Roy Romer’s administration defending Amendment 2, which barred the enforcement of many anti-discrimination ordinances in the state, against legal challenges even though the administration did not agree with the measure.
Secretary of State Gessler(R) continues to insist that his actions are intended to protect the free speech of voters. But, while voter ID laws have yet to reach the state, many are beginning to wonder if Colorado won’t be the next state to institute such rules.

manicchill:

Colorado’s Secretary of State Joins Republicans in the War on Voters

Since first entering the race, to be Colorado’s next Secretary of State, controversy has been Scott Gessler’s constant companion. Whether it be his hypocritical public stance on “soft” campaign contributions, the ethics violations of his top donors, blocking Pueblo Country from sending ballots to soldiers, or his efforts to prevent cities/counties from mailing ballots to absentee voters, Mr. Gessler hasn’t made many friends outside of his own party/inner circle.

Now, he’s drawing national attention for his recent decision to re-interpret, and in some cases completely throw out, Colorado’s long-standing campaign finance disclosure laws.

from The Colorado Independent:

Government watchdog group Colorado Ethics Watch has been engaged in a legal back and forth with Secretary of State Scott Gessler over a campaign finance rule adopted by the Secretary of State last spring. In a brief filed with a Denver District court Wednesday, Ethics Watch argues Gessler is rewriting the law instead of merely setting forth rules directing citizens on how to abide it, and, in a counter claim, Gessler is asking the court to effectively throw out a constitutional provision he has sworn he would defend as an elected official.

Gessler has asked the court to declare the legal definition of an “issue committee” unenforceable, meaning he effectively would do away with issue committees and the financial and reporting laws that apply to them until if and when the legislature would remake them.

“It’s breathtaking,” Ethics Watch Director Luis Toro told the Colorado Independent. “As a representative of the state, [Gessler] would normally be the defendant in such a case… But he’s effectively asking two private organizations to defend the Colorado Constitution from his complaint. How can he sue two organizations that don’t represent the state?”

Read More

To any familiar with his past, as a campaign finance attorney with a long history of battling disclosure rules, Scott Gessler’s actions were predictable. They also join a long, and continually growing, list of Republican moves aimed at crippling the Democratic Party and base nationwide. Gessler has justified his actions by saying they are no different than the Justice Department’s recent decision to stop defending the Defense of Marriage Act in court.

Watchdog and ethics groups have countered that Secretary of State Gessler’s stance stands in stark opposition to the state’s history of being defended by its public officials. Many point to then-Governor Roy Romer’s administration defending Amendment 2, which barred the enforcement of many anti-discrimination ordinances in the state, against legal challenges even though the administration did not agree with the measure.

Secretary of State Gessler(R) continues to insist that his actions are intended to protect the free speech of voters. But, while voter ID laws have yet to reach the state, many are beginning to wonder if Colorado won’t be the next state to institute such rules.

(Source: manicchill)

Filed under Politics News Republicans GOP Scott Gessler Colorado Voting Campaign Contributions Campaign Finance Disclosure War on Voters

56 notes

Here is what is peculiar. Many conservative Christians, mostly Protestant but also a number of Catholics, have come to believe and proudly proclaim that the creator of the universe favors free wheeling, deregulated, union busting, minimal taxes especially for wealthy investors, plutocrat-boosting capitalism as the ideal earthly scheme for his human creations. And many of these Christian capitalists are ardent followers of Ayn Rand, who was one of - and many of whose followers are — the most hard-line anti-Christian atheist/s you can get. Meanwhile many Christians who support the capitalist policies associated with social Darwinistic strenuously denounce Darwin’s evolutionary science because it supposedly leads to, well, social Darwinism!
From Jesus’ socialism to capitalistic Christianity (via janedoe225)

(Source: comradeclaudia, via gerutha)

Filed under hahahaaaa yes Christianity socian darwinism Republicans Ayn Rand hypocrisy

116 notes

underthemountainbunker:

Top 1% of taxpayers receive more income than entire bottom half combined
From the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Tax policy should lean against the rising tide of income inequality, not exacerbate it. During the first three decades after World War II, economic growth was  robust and widely shared: economy-wide productivity improvements were  accompanied by significant increases in the living standards of most  Americans. In recent decades, by contrast, the benefits of economic  growth have not been widely shared. CBO data show that between  1979 and 2007, the average after-tax income of the top 1 percent of  Americans grew by 281 percent, after adjusting for inflation, compared  to just 25 percent for the middle 20 percent of Americans, and ­­16  percent for the poorest fifth of the population.[13]
The tax cuts enacted in 2001 and  2003 provided the largest benefit to the highest-income households and  widened these yawning income disparities. Under these tax cuts,  households with incomes over $1 million stand to receive an average tax  cut of $130,000 in 2012, according to the Tax Policy Center, equivalent  to an increase of 6.3 percent in their after-tax income. Meanwhile,  households in the middle of the income spectrum will receive tax cuts  that equal 2.3 percent of their income. Households in the bottom  quintile will receive an average increase in income of less than 1  percent. [14] (See Figure 3.)

Summary: after tax incomes from Bush’s tax cuts:
Households > $1 million: increase of 6.3%
Households in middle income: increase of 2.3%
Households in bottom quintile: increase of < 1%

The GOP has been actively engaged in bottom-to-top income  redistribution. And because of God, guns, and gays, the fundamentalist  teabaggers will vote for it — despite their own precarious financial  situation.
Want it to stop? Vote next time.
via: @allisonkilkenny

Member this the next time someone complains about the poor paying no income taxes: they have so little income to pay from that it only makes sense.

underthemountainbunker:

Top 1% of taxpayers receive more income than entire bottom half combined

From the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Tax policy should lean against the rising tide of income inequality, not exacerbate it. During the first three decades after World War II, economic growth was robust and widely shared: economy-wide productivity improvements were accompanied by significant increases in the living standards of most Americans. In recent decades, by contrast, the benefits of economic growth have not been widely shared. CBO data show that between 1979 and 2007, the average after-tax income of the top 1 percent of Americans grew by 281 percent, after adjusting for inflation, compared to just 25 percent for the middle 20 percent of Americans, and ­­16 percent for the poorest fifth of the population.[13]

The tax cuts enacted in 2001 and 2003 provided the largest benefit to the highest-income households and widened these yawning income disparities. Under these tax cuts, households with incomes over $1 million stand to receive an average tax cut of $130,000 in 2012, according to the Tax Policy Center, equivalent to an increase of 6.3 percent in their after-tax income. Meanwhile, households in the middle of the income spectrum will receive tax cuts that equal 2.3 percent of their income. Households in the bottom quintile will receive an average increase in income of less than 1 percent. [14] (See Figure 3.)

Summary: after tax incomes from Bush’s tax cuts:

  • Households > $1 million: increase of 6.3%
  • Households in middle income: increase of 2.3%
  • Households in bottom quintile: increase of < 1%

http://www.cbpp.org/images/cms//9-27-11tax-f3.jpg

The GOP has been actively engaged in bottom-to-top income redistribution. And because of God, guns, and gays, the fundamentalist teabaggers will vote for it — despite their own precarious financial situation.

Want it to stop? Vote next time.

via: @allisonkilkenny

Member this the next time someone complains about the poor paying no income taxes: they have so little income to pay from that it only makes sense.

Filed under politics class war income redistribution unemployment vote! war on the middle class botton-to-top income redistribution Bush's tax cuts Center on Budget and Policy Priorities GOP income inequality Republicans spending cuts for the rest of us tax cuts for the wealthy tax policy tea party