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Posts tagged drugs

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Materasso told the reporters that the cars were pulled over “for some identified violation,” but that’s obvious nonsense. If the cars had been pulled over for real violations, the police would have issued 22 citations rather than three. Quite obviously, the police pulled over these vehicles on mere pretexts in order to search the cars for drugs. This was a fishing expedition, pure and simple. Or, to put the matter another way, Westminster police used tax dollars to flagrantly violate the rights of Colorado citizens. (And please let nobody claim that these rights violations are fine just because the police can get away with them in court.)
Westminster (suburb of Denver) sets up “drug checkpoints” on US 36.

Filed under colorado denver westminster drugs rights

30 notes

Colorado Asks DEA to Reschedule Marijuana, DEA Expected to Ignore Request

The head of the Colorado Department of Revenue has written a letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration asking that federal controls on marijuana be loosened slightly to account for its “potential medicinal value.”

Colorado is the third state with a medical-marijuana program to ask the DEA to reschedule marijuana…

The letter asks that the DEA consider moving marijuana from schedule I — a category that includes such drugs as heroin and LSD that are not considered to have medicinal value — to schedule II. Drugs in that category, such as methadone and cocaine, are considered to have some medicinal value but also be highly addictive.

Schedule II substances are able to be prescribed by doctors but are still subject to strict controls. It is unclear whether Colorado’s medical-marijuana laws — which allow doctors to authorize marijuana use through recommendation and allow patients to grow their own cannabis plants — would clash with those controls.

Earlier this year, the governors of Rhode Island and Washington also asked the DEA to reschedule marijuana. The DEA has in the past rejected similar requests to reclassify the substance.

According to the US Government, Marijuana is more dangerous, more addictive, and has less of a medicinal use than cocaine and methadone. This is a clear and obvious lie.

Filed under marijuana DEA drugs War on drugs drug war

233 notes

Oklahoma mother gets 10 years for $31 marijuana sale

kamaolesands:

jonathan-cunningham:

robot-heart-politics:

Hey, I have an idea for how we can cut the budget…

Finally, this criminal posing as a functioning, contributing member of society will be added to our permanent underclass.  And to think, it will only cost the tax payer $162,020.  

But wait a moment- what about her children?  We can’t have a relative of the children raising them, they might have a shot at a decent life.  Oh, nevermind, we arrested their grandmother as well:

Police say Spottedcrow and her 50-year-old mother Delita Starr sold $11 worth of pot to an undercover cop at her home in 2009 on New Year’s Eve, according to The Oklahoman. Two weeks later, the cop came back and bought $20 worth of marijuana.

Both women were arrested and charged with drug distribution. And since Spottedcrow’s children were present in the home during the drug deal, the pair was also charged with possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor, according to the paper.

So, two children are without parents and the tax payer is out $324,040, plus the cost of raising the orphans we made.  Sounds like our legal system works just fine to me!

i wasn’t aware marijuana was a dangerous substance….

Patricia Spottedcrow is still in prison and kept from her four children, over a year after her conviction. She reflects on her sad tale:

"The first eight months were a blur," Spottedcrow said. "I just cried a lot. It’s like I woke up a couple of months ago." 

Her daily schedule starts with breakfast at 5:30 a.m., followed by her job in the laundry. At 4:30 p.m., she is released and goes to the gym, followed by dinner and then church at 7 p.m. 

"You have to try and keep your mind busy," she said. "It’s easy to get sad, depressed and stuck in your own head in here"…

But it’s her kids taking up most of her thoughts. 

"I was there every day taking of care of them before this," she said. "I did everything from going to football games and PTA." 

While in prison, Spottedcrow has taken parenting classes, finished her GED and participates in a grief/loss recovery program, a behavior course, Alcoholics Anonymous/Narcotics Anonymous and a faith-based program. She is on a waiting list to begin higher education and Career Tech classes. 

"The life I was living before, that’s over," Spottedcrow said. "I’m not playing with my life anymore. I would never chance this again for my children." 

Spottedcrow never denied she smoked pot but said she was never a drug dealer or ever used or sold marijuana in front of her children. 

"I got myself in this situation, and I’m not saying I shouldn’t be punished," she said. "But I think this is a little excessive, especially looking at other cases from my county. And I’m sleeping next to people who have killed people, and they have less time than me. There are days I really can’t believe I’m in prison." 

Presidents use their pardon power all the time for criminals that are in the white moneyed social circles. It’s a shame they won’t use it to actually correct injustices- these children will grow up without a mother, because some dirtbag asked her if she had any pot, then arrested her when she was nice enough to share.

(Source: , via nema-tode)

Filed under drugs war on drugs

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Obama's Commutation: a prelude to systemic reform?

There are hundreds of thousands of Americans serving outrageously long prison sentences for nonviolent drug offenses as a result of our nation’s widely discredited and inhumane "war on drugs." On Tuesday night, President Obama did something he had not yet done as president — he commuted someone’s prison term. While we applaud President Obama’s decision to allow Eugenia Marie Jennings, a mother of three suffering from cancer who has served 10 years of her 22-year sentence for selling 13.9 grams of crack cocaine, to return to her family 12 years earlier than she otherwise would have, we hope this stands not as a mere isolated gesture of generosity but rather marks the beginning of an enduring, fundamental change in the president’s systemic approach to drug policy.

We have commended the president for his role in the passage of the Fair Sentencing Act, which reduced the crack to powder cocaine sentencing disparity from 100-to-1 to 18-to-1. But much more reform is still needed. Indeed, many nonviolent drug offenders — including Ms. Jennings — do not benefit from the newly reduced disparity. And even those who do benefit still receive a sentence that is disproportionately harsh and that disproportionately affects African-Americans.

Furthermore, while Ms. Jennings likely caught the president’s attention because of her particularly sympathetic story, strong legal team and a supportive United States senator, there are so many more like Ms. Jennings who don’t have such powerful advocates and yet are no less deserving of the president’s mercy. With hundreds of thousands of nonviolent drug offending Americans behind bars, sporadic commutations aren’t nearly enough to solve the nation’s current incarceration crisis or prevent us from perpetuating the unjust “war on drugs” in future generations.

It’s sweet that Mr. Obama pardoned Marie Jennings, but it’s clearly a publicity stunt. He wants people to believe he cares about these issues without actually having the courage to face them. He threw a bone to a single person and now expects us to forgive him when he destroys hundreds of thousands of other people’s lives in the name of political expediency. 

Filed under Obama ACLU War on drugs drugs

282 notes

The CIA admitted in 1998 that guerrilla armies it actively supported in Nicaragua were smuggling illegal drugs into the United States—drugs that were making their way onto the streets of inner-city black neighborhoods in the form of crack cocaine. The CIA also admitted that, in the midst of the War on Drugs, it blocked law enforcement efforts to investigate illegal drug networks that were helping to fund its covert war in Nicaragua.
Michelle Alexander, from The New Jim Crow.  Michelle’s source for this information includes a book by Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair called Whiteout: The CIA, Drugs, and the Press.  She also cites two different newspaper articles and a 2004 magazine article written by Cockburn for The Nation.  Cockburn is a political journalist with a long list of credentials.  Also, the CIA’s complicity and active encouragement of the drug trade has been well documented. (via letterstomycountry)

Filed under CIA Nicaragua war on drugs drugs

69 notes

Lawrence O’Donnel breaks down the government’s position on getting high:

Senators, Members of Congress, Presidents, Vice Presidents, and Supreme Court Justices are going to continue to get high (many of them every day and every night). Many of them will do it publicly, and loudly, and legally at restaurants and campaign fundraisers and at state dinners. They will raise their glasses and get high, and they will continue to put people in jail for using a harmless, non-liquid way of getting high like Marijuana.

Filed under MSNBC drugs Marijuana alcohol hypocrisy

47 notes

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Drug Czar Says ‘Young People’ Smoke Pot Because They Saw Grandma Do It When She Was Getting Chemotherapy | Reason

“People keep calling it medicine,” [Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske] said at a press conference [Thursday], “and that’s the wrong message for young people to hear.”
[…] Kerlikowske’s argument suggests that a drug should not be recognized as a medicine if teenagers can use to alter their consciousness. But as the Drug Policy Alliance’s Bill Piper observes, “In the field of medicine, whether or not a youth might abuse something doesn’t determine whether or not an adult should have access to a medication and whether a doctor should prescribe it.” Kerlikowske does not extend his logic to the stimulants, sedatives, tranquilizers, and opioid painkillers that can be legally obtained with a doctor’s prescription. +

Pretty sure watching grandma use marijuana to get through chemo wouldn’t exactly add to the allure of smoking it…

I cannot fathom the insensitivity necessary to make a comment like that. “I know they’re watching their grandmother die slowly, but the important thing is to make sure they don’t use her medication recreationally at some point in the future”. Just despicable!

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Drug Czar Says ‘Young People’ Smoke Pot Because They Saw Grandma Do It When She Was Getting Chemotherapy | Reason

“People keep calling it medicine,” [Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske] said at a press conference [Thursday], “and that’s the wrong message for young people to hear.”

[…] Kerlikowske’s argument suggests that a drug should not be recognized as a medicine if teenagers can use to alter their consciousness. But as the Drug Policy Alliance’s Bill Piper observes, “In the field of medicine, whether or not a youth might abuse something doesn’t determine whether or not an adult should have access to a medication and whether a doctor should prescribe it.” Kerlikowske does not extend his logic to the stimulants, sedatives, tranquilizers, and opioid painkillers that can be legally obtained with a doctor’s prescription. +

Pretty sure watching grandma use marijuana to get through chemo wouldn’t exactly add to the allure of smoking it…

I cannot fathom the insensitivity necessary to make a comment like that. “I know they’re watching their grandmother die slowly, but the important thing is to make sure they don’t use her medication recreationally at some point in the future”. Just despicable!

Filed under Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske cannabis drugs marijuana medical marijuana methamphetamine reefer madness Reason