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Posts tagged Poverty

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17.2 percent of Colorado’s children are food insecure. These children live in households where there is a lack of access to enough food to meet their basic needs.
The Campaign to End Childhood Hunger in Colorado

(Source: strength.org)

Filed under Hunger Poverty Colorado

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The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities has compiled data on the effect of tax credits for working families on women- specifically, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC). Arloc Sherman has more:

Using data and procedures explained here, I estimate that the EITC kept an estimated 3.4 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010.  That figure includes the effect of temporary 2009 Recovery Act expansions in the EITC, which alone kept 233,000 women and girls above the poverty line.
The numbers rise when you include a second federal income tax credit — the less well-known CTC, which provides up to $1,000 per child for working families:  together, the CTC and EITC kept 4.9 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010, including more than 800,000 just by the Recovery Act’s expansions of both credits.

The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities has compiled data on the effect of tax credits for working families on women- specifically, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC). Arloc Sherman has more:

Using data and procedures explained here, I estimate that the EITC kept an estimated 3.4 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010.  That figure includes the effect of temporary 2009 Recovery Act expansions in the EITC, which alone kept 233,000 women and girls above the poverty line.

The numbers rise when you include a second federal income tax credit — the less well-known CTC, which provides up to $1,000 per child for working families:  together, the CTC and EITC kept 4.9 million women and girls above the poverty line in 2010, including more than 800,000 just by the Recovery Act’s expansions of both credits.

Filed under poverty women tax taxes taxation budget recovery

569 notes

Too poor to pay taxes? Burn, useless prole.

A local family watches their home burn to the ground and just a few feet behind them, firefighters watch, too.

It’s happened multiple times before in one local community: firefighters refuse to respond because the homeowner didn’t pay a fire subscription fee.

The last time this happened, the city of South Fulton, Tennessee, received a lot of heat nationwide for this policy. That was more than a year ago but nothing has changed.

The mayor said it comes down to simple business. If they don’t collect fire fees, the fire department can’t survive and if they make exceptions to the rule, no one will ever pay the fee.

Besides that, he likes the “pay for spray” policy and said it’s fair.

But that’s hard to stomach when you’ve just lost your home and everything you’ve worked for.

"In an emergency, the first thing you think of, ‘Call 9-1-1," homeowner Vicky Bell said.

Firefighters came out.

Bell said, “9-1-1 said they were in fact dispatched and they showed that they were on the scene.”

But once on the scene, they only watched.

"You could look out my mom’s trailer and see the trucks sitting at a distance," Bell said.

For Bell, that sight was almost as disturbing as the fire itself.

"We just wished we could’ve gotten more out," Bell said.

It’s a controversial policy that we’ve dealt with before. If you live in the city, you get fire protection but if not, you have to pay the $75 fire protection fee each year. With this policy, the city makes no exceptions.

Well, it took long enough, but our government has finally devolved into the same environment that lead Marcus Crassus to his wealth. Countdown until we start letting the poor die when they can’t afford healthcare. Whoops, I mean countdown until Police don’t have to answer calls from poor people. Whoops, I mean countdown until poor people get arrested for sending their kids to well funded schools

Well, damn. I’d like to write a ridiculous, hyperbolic sentence about the next step in our disenfranchisement of the poor, but I can’t even top reality.

Filed under Poverty Disenfranchisement firefighters social services

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1/3 of previously middle class Americans are now poor

The study focused on people who were middle-class teenagers in 1979 and who were between 39 and 44 years old in 2004 and 2006. It defines people as middle-class if they fall between the 30th and 70th percentiles in income distribution, which for a family of four is between $32,900 and $64,000 a year in 2010 dollars.

People were deemed downwardly mobile if they fell below the 30th percentile in income, if their income rank was 20 or more percentiles below their parents’ rank, or if they earn at least 20 percent less than their parents. The findings do not cover the difficult times that the nation has endured since 2007.

So, before the credit crunch, before the housing bubble broke, before the banks began to steal people’s houses with fraudulent paperwork and the government reneged on it’s guarantees to provide social services, 1/3 of Americans who grew up in middle class families are now impoverished. 

What would our demographics look like today? How many citizens have been forced into poverty by the deliberate theft of wealth from the middle class?

Filed under poverty economy