Tumble DC 25

Marginally better than silence

27 notes

BDS victory at TIAA-CREF

In February 2011, 20 shareholders filed a resolution asking TIAA-CREF to “engage” with companies doing business with occupying forces. This resolution might seem weakly worded, but it inspired the administrators to take drastic measures. Their first response was to disallow a vote by shareholders on the proposal and to request SEC approval for this action.

After the resulting outrage among activists and the promise of protests at its doorstep, TIAA-CREF moved its annual shareholder meeting from New York City to Charlotte, N.C. Despite the change of venue, however, dozens of activists still showed up outside the shareholder meeting to demand divestment from Israeli apartheid.

This year’s proposal is much more direct than the one submitted in 2011. It demands that TIAA-CREF “end investments in companies that, in the trustees’ judgment, substantially contribute to or enable egregious violations of human rights, including companies whose business supports Israel’s occupation.”

This resolution had 10 times as many shareholders backing it. The unequivocal wording produced stronger opposition from pro-Zionist forces. TIAA-CREF has been threatened with a lawsuit by Shurat HaDin, the Israel Law Center (ILC), if it allows the resolution to come to a vote. ILC is a Tel Aviv-based nonprofit that focuses on issues related to the Palestinian struggle for justice. Its work includes blocking other BDS work around the globe, as well as legal efforts to keep Gaza’s southern border closed.

I was published in Socialist Worker! If you’re interested in the BDS movement or the campaign specifically targetting TIAA CREF, check it out. 

Filed under ISO Socialist Worker BDS Palestine Israeli Occupation

384 notes

Where was the NRA on Trayvon Martin’s right to stand his ground? What happened to their principled position? Let’s be clear: the Trayvon Martin’s of the world never had that right because the “ground” was never considered theirs to stand on. Unless black people could magically produce some official documentation proving that they are not burglars, rapists, drug dealers, pimps or prostitutes, intruders, they are assumed to be “up to no good.”

Robin Kelly 

"The point is that justice was always going to elude Trayvon Martin, not because the system failed, but because it worked. Martin died and Zimmerman walked because our entire political and legal foundations were built on an ideology of settler colonialism — an ideology in which the protection of white property rights was always sacrosanct; predators and threats to those privileges were almost always black, brown, and red; and where the very purpose of police power was to discipline, monitor, and contain populations rendered a threat to white property and privilege.

(via musaafer)

(via randomactsofchaos)

16 notes

We know that this will do them no harm; that’s not the point. Another developer will take our slot at the Megabooth; they won’t lose any ticket sales; we won’t hurt their feelings. If anything, we’re hurting ourselves– our ability to reach new fans who might not have heard of Gone Home, to connect with players, sell stuff, meet with press and video crews, and so on.

But this is not something that we’re doing for practical reasons. We are a four-person team. Two of us are women and one of us is gay. Gone Home deals in part with LGBT issues. This stuff is important to us, on a lot of different levels. And Penny Arcade is not an entity that we feel welcomed by or comfortable operating alongside.

Gone Home developer The Fullbright Company withdraws from PAX

18 notes

socialismartnature:


===
The long-awaited schedule for Socialism 2013 is now available. Let the tough process of narrowing down what talks to attend begin! 
Socialism 2013 is pleased to host sessions on a wide range of topics, designed to offer both ideas about strategies in our movements as well as theory to guide the fight for a better future. The full conference schedule is provided below.
http://www.socialismconference.org/sessions/

socialismartnature:

===

The long-awaited schedule for Socialism 2013 is now available. Let the tough process of narrowing down what talks to attend begin!

Socialism 2013 is pleased to host sessions on a wide range of topics, designed to offer both ideas about strategies in our movements as well as theory to guide the fight for a better future. The full conference schedule is provided below.

http://www.socialismconference.org/sessions/

(via redplebeian)

12 notes

Don't miss Jeremy Scahill and Glenn Greenwald at Socialism 2013

socialistworker:

Don’t miss Jeremy Scahill and Glenn Greenwald at…
logo
A weekend of revolutionary politics, debate, and entertainment
JUNE 27 - JUNE 30
CHICAGO, IL

“As someone who speaks at all sorts of political gatherings every year, I can say with certainty that no event assembles more passionate activism, genuine expertise, and provocative insights than the Socialism Conference. This will be my third straight year attending, and what keeps me coming back is how invigorating and inspiring it is to be in the midst of such diverse and impressive activists, “said Glenn Greenwald about the Socialism conference.

Glenn Greenwald and Jeremy Scahill have both made tremendous contributions in exposing the truth about U.S. politics and the way the government behaves at home and abroad. Do not miss Greenwald and Scahill at Socialism 2013 and this incredibly urgent discussion about the attack on civil liberties, U.S. imperialism, and how we can fight back.

Glenn Greenwald is a journalist for the Guardian, responsible for exposing the National Security Agency’s massive spying operation of the U.S. government on its own citizens.
Watch Greenwald discuss the NSA, whistleblowers, the U.S. media here.


Jeremy Scahill
is the writer and producer of the documentary Dirty Wars. Author of Dirty Wars: The world is a battlefield and Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army.

Watch Scahill’s analysis on Democracy Now! about Dirty Wars and the latest developments in U.S. imperialism here.

More Workshops on the U.S Imperialism, the war on civil liberties,  Islamaphobia, Palestine:


Obama’s war on civil liberties  featuring Ali Al-Arian

US Imperialism in the Middle East after the Arab Spring 
featuring Yusef Khalil, Shaun Joseph, Wael Elasady
What happened to the Egyptian Revolution?  featuring Hani Shukrallah, Mostafa Ali, and Hatem Tallima
The new movement against Israeli apartheid featuring Shirien Damra, Ziad Abbas and Nolan Rampy
The struggle for Palestine featuring Ali Abunimah 
Israel, Zionism, and imperialism featuring Deepa Kumar and Sherry Wolf
The real “Pirates of the Caribbean” featuring Dana Blanchard
Mali and the new imperial scramble for Africa featuring Sarah Knopp
The Marxist theory of imperialism and its critics featuring Lee Wengraf
U.S. imperialism’s “pivot to Asia” featuring Ashley Smith
The making of global capitalism featuring Sam Gindin
Drones, special forces, and bases: Obama’s new imperial strategy featuring Khury Petersen-Smith
Kill anything that moves: The real American war in Vietnam featuring Nick Turse
__________

More about Socialism2013:

Millions of people have come to the understanding that capitalism is no longer working. 
From extreme weather caused by climate change to the relentless drive to slash workers’ living standards to the epidemic of police brutality, the signs of a society in crisis are all around us. The question isn’t whether society has run amok; the question is what to do about it.
 
The Socialism 2013 conference will bring together hundreds of activists from across the U.S., and around the world, to tackle the many discussions and debates that confront anyone interested in changing the world. How can women’s liberation and LGBT equality be won? What will it take to win real justice for immigrant workers? Can organized labor make a comeback? What lessons can be learned from the revolutions shaking the Middle East? Why is Marxism relevant today?
 
Featured speakers include teachers on the front lines of the fight to defend public education, anti-racist fighters against police brutality and the New Jim Crow, trade unionists, Marxist authors, radical historians, and much more. Start making your plans to attend. 
 
REGISTER HERE
__________
 
Visit WeAreMany.org to view and listen to all of the meetings from last year’s conference!

919 notes

This morning, I’ve learned that a gas station in Colorado was previously selling ‘humorous’ licenses to murder undocumented immigrants. I was stunned and shocked, but then I learned that it’s not the first time that such ‘licenses’ have been printed. This sort of thing is key in the normalization of oppression. We are witnessing the creation of a new class of exploitable citizen that has almost no recourse for violence or hate. You can contact the company that prints this nonsense at this link.

Filed under racism violence white supremacy colorado

223 notes

tranqualizer:

URGENT: Alfredo Can Be Deported at Any Time! Let Him Go!! 
Alfredo Carrillo (A# 089-826-103), father of 3 US citizen children who has lived in the U.S. for 17 years was pulled over and detained for driving without a license in Arapaho County, Colorado. Currently Alfredo is being held in Otoro County Processing Center, NM. Although Alfredo was previously deported in 2008, due to the economic hardships his family was facing he returned in 2010. He is low priority and should be released. Make a Phone Call:Call ICE Director John Morton (202) 732-3000Sample Script: “ I am calling to urge ICE to release Alfredo Carrillo (A# 089-826-103), who is currently being held in Otero County Processing Center. Alfredo has been in the U.S. for over 16 years and has 3 U.S. citizen children that need the financial and emotional support of their father. Alfredo is low priority case that shouldn’t be detained. Let Alfredo Go!” 
SIGN THIS PETITION AND MAKE A CALL!

tranqualizer:

URGENT: Alfredo Can Be Deported at Any Time! Let Him Go!! 


Alfredo Carrillo (A# 089-826-103), father of 3 US citizen children who has lived in the U.S. for 17 years was pulled over and detained for driving without a license in Arapaho County, Colorado. Currently Alfredo is being held in Otoro County Processing Center, NM. Although Alfredo was previously deported in 2008, due to the economic hardships his family was facing he returned in 2010. He is low priority and should be released. 

Make a Phone Call:


Call ICE Director John Morton (202) 732-3000

Sample Script: “ I am calling to urge ICE to release Alfredo Carrillo (A# 089-826-103), who is currently being held in Otero County Processing Center. Alfredo has been in the U.S. for over 16 years and has 3 U.S. citizen children that need the financial and emotional support of their father. Alfredo is low priority case that shouldn’t be detained. Let Alfredo Go!” 

SIGN THIS PETITION AND MAKE A CALL!

(via neoliberalismkills)

346 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Sex trafficking and the Super BowlFebruary 3, 2013
On the Catholic liturgical calendar, February 5 is the Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time. In the U.S., where professional football is sometimes referred to as a “religion,” February 5th is the highest holy day of the sporting year: Super Bowl Sunday.
The Super Bowl attracts tens of thousands of fans to the host city, and millions of television viewers, making it the most watched broadcast each year. But it also attracts a sector of violent, organized criminal activity that operates in plain sight without notice: human sex trafficking.
Human trafficking is defined by the United Nations as the “recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons, by means of threat, use of force or other forms of coercion, for the purpose of exploitation.”  Sex trafficking is particularly heinous: Young women are abducted and sold into an underworld network where they are forced to engage in sexual activity for no pay, and from which it is extremely difficult to escape.
There is evidence that human trafficking increases where major sporting events are held.
Exact numbers are hard to come by, as trafficking is an underreported crime, but host cities, law enforcement, and civil society are becoming increasingly more aware of it. They are promoting educational campaigns and strengthening laws against trafficking to send a strong message to traffickers: You are not welcome here. If we find you, you will be prosecuted. There is a message for trafficking victims as well: If we find you, you will not be arrested; you will be rescued.
In preparation for Super Bowl LXVI in Indianapolis, 11 congregations of Catholic women joined the fight against human trafficking in a unique way: They decided to use their investments as a means to address human trafficking with Indianapolis area hotels. These 11 congregations belong to CCRIM, the Coalition for Corporate Responsibility in Indiana and Michigan.
CCRIM members bought shares of stock in major hotel chains in order to address the issue of trafficking as shareholders with hotel corporate management, as well as with the local franchises in the Indianapolis area. As shareholders they have a stake in how the business is run, and they decided to work with the hotels to help them recognize and report any incidents of human trafficking.
The sisters set up a database of 220 hotels within a 50-mile radius of Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. On January 5, the managers of these hotels received a fax from CCRIM that said, your shareholders want to know: Have your staff members been trained to recognize the signs of human trafficking? Do you have plans in place so your staff members can safely report any trafficking incidents? Do you know who to contact in the Indianapolis area in order to protect the victims and prosecute the traffickers? Would you be willing to make educational materials on trafficking available to your staff and your guests?
For the next 10 days, 40 sisters called the managers to get answers to those questions. Although 20 managers were reluctant or refused to speak to them, they did speak with 200 hotel managers. The results? Seven hotels requested help in setting up a training session, and the sisters linked them to trainers.
Forty-five hotels already had conducted training for their staff members. Ninety-nine hotels asked for the local contact list, which includes the Attorney General’s Office, the Indianapolis police department’s Anti-Trafficking Division, safe houses for victims and 24-hour hotline numbers.
They also asked for informational brochures, provided by the Polaris Project (an initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services) to help their staff and guests recognize the signs of human trafficking. The sisters delivered this information to each manager personally and thanked them for their cooperation in stemming the tide of trafficking at this year’s Super Bowl.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Sex trafficking and the Super Bowl
February 3, 2013

On the Catholic liturgical calendar, February 5 is the Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time. In the U.S., where professional football is sometimes referred to as a “religion,” February 5th is the highest holy day of the sporting year: Super Bowl Sunday.

The Super Bowl attracts tens of thousands of fans to the host city, and millions of television viewers, making it the most watched broadcast each year. But it also attracts a sector of violent, organized criminal activity that operates in plain sight without notice: human sex trafficking.

Human trafficking is defined by the United Nations as the “recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons, by means of threat, use of force or other forms of coercion, for the purpose of exploitation.”  Sex trafficking is particularly heinous: Young women are abducted and sold into an underworld network where they are forced to engage in sexual activity for no pay, and from which it is extremely difficult to escape.

There is evidence that human trafficking increases where major sporting events are held.

Exact numbers are hard to come by, as trafficking is an underreported crime, but host cities, law enforcement, and civil society are becoming increasingly more aware of it. They are promoting educational campaigns and strengthening laws against trafficking to send a strong message to traffickers: You are not welcome here. If we find you, you will be prosecuted. There is a message for trafficking victims as well: If we find you, you will not be arrested; you will be rescued.

In preparation for Super Bowl LXVI in Indianapolis, 11 congregations of Catholic women joined the fight against human trafficking in a unique way: They decided to use their investments as a means to address human trafficking with Indianapolis area hotels. These 11 congregations belong to CCRIM, the Coalition for Corporate Responsibility in Indiana and Michigan.

CCRIM members bought shares of stock in major hotel chains in order to address the issue of trafficking as shareholders with hotel corporate management, as well as with the local franchises in the Indianapolis area. As shareholders they have a stake in how the business is run, and they decided to work with the hotels to help them recognize and report any incidents of human trafficking.

The sisters set up a database of 220 hotels within a 50-mile radius of Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. On January 5, the managers of these hotels received a fax from CCRIM that said, your shareholders want to know: Have your staff members been trained to recognize the signs of human trafficking? Do you have plans in place so your staff members can safely report any trafficking incidents? Do you know who to contact in the Indianapolis area in order to protect the victims and prosecute the traffickers? Would you be willing to make educational materials on trafficking available to your staff and your guests?

For the next 10 days, 40 sisters called the managers to get answers to those questions. Although 20 managers were reluctant or refused to speak to them, they did speak with 200 hotel managers. The results? Seven hotels requested help in setting up a training session, and the sisters linked them to trainers.

Forty-five hotels already had conducted training for their staff members. Ninety-nine hotels asked for the local contact list, which includes the Attorney General’s Office, the Indianapolis police department’s Anti-Trafficking Division, safe houses for victims and 24-hour hotline numbers.

They also asked for informational brochures, provided by the Polaris Project (an initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services) to help their staff and guests recognize the signs of human trafficking. The sisters delivered this information to each manager personally and thanked them for their cooperation in stemming the tide of trafficking at this year’s Super Bowl.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via occupyingyourpolitics)

399 notes

Eight men have already been arrested as part of a sex trafficking ring exposed today in New Orleans. This case supports advocacy agencies’ claims that the Super Bowl is the “single largest human trafficking incident in the United States.” When you combine beer, testosterone, and cold hard cash with hundreds of thousands of people in a major metropolitan area, you know sex trafficking is going to become a reality for a number of women and men on the ground, but the question is, what’s being done to fix it? In January 2011, Christian advocacy organizations united to expose trafficking occurring in the shadows of the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium, and Texas attorney general Greg Abbott “beefed up a [police] unit that was assigned to investigate and arrest those who trade in child prostitutes.” As a result, there were a routine 113 arrests for prostitution at the 2011 Super Bowl—but none for trafficking.

In the past, attempted crackdowns by law enforcement have misfired by treating prostitutes as criminals to be locked up rather than victims to be rescued. According to Nevada District Judge William Voy, providing former prostitutes and sexually exploited girls with restoration services is crucial—he’s seen more than his fair share of girls appearing before him shackled at the hands and feet, “as though they were criminals instead of victims:”

Sex Trafficking at the Super Bowl (via jayaprada)

(via tr0tskitty)